10 Tips For Dining Out Healthy

Portion sizes are much larger in most restaurants. Try ordering an appetizer as your entrée, or split a meal with a friend. (Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

Portion sizes are much larger in most restaurants. Try ordering an appetizer as your entrée, or split a meal with a friend. (Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

Dining out doesn’t have to expand your waistline. Here are 10 tips for eating healthy when you’re out on the town (via The Biggest Loser Resort):

  1. Don’t arrive starving. It’ll make you more likely to eat too quickly and overeat.
  2. Drink water. Water helps keep you hydrated, and fills you up without calories. Add lemon, orange, lime or cucumbers to your water for a splash of flavor.
  3. Look up nutrition and calorie information beforehand. Be knowledgable!  These days, most restaurants provide nutrition facts online, and many offer lower calorie meal options.
  4. Watch your sodium intake. Sodium makes your body retain water, which can leave you feeling bloated and uncomfortable. Continue Reading …
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How to Dine Out Healthy

Tip #8: To avoid the “clean plate club” temptation, ask the kitchen to package half of your food in a to-go container prior to serving. (Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net)

The next time you’re dining in a restaurant, remember this: restaurants cook for taste, not always for health, often leaving you with more salt, fat and calories in your body than you bargained for. But there’s no need to forego eating out altogether. Instead, follow these 10 tips for dining smarter (via Cleveland Clinic):

  1. Plan ahead. Browse the menu ahead of time to pinpoint a healthy choice. Many restaurants have nutrition information available on their websites.
  2. Make your own rules. Decide what your personal dining-out rules are, and stick to them. A few good ones to try: leaving 1/3 of the food on your plate, choosing to review only certain sections of the menu when ordering, choosing only non-friend foods, avoiding the bread basket, and eating dessert only when it’s shared by the whole family.
  3. Check the menu for healthy terms like broiled, grilled, stir-fried, roasted or poached. Avoid words like buttery, sauteed, fried or pan-friend, creamed,  scalloped or au gratin.
  4. Order it “dry.” Eating food without oil or butter will help you to stick to your goals. To add flavor, consider one of the following: broth, lemon, wine, herbs, spices and salsa can provide plenty of flavor without concentrated fat calories.Continue Reading …
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